FROM DILIP MUKERJEA

"Genius is in-born, may it never be still-born."

"Oysters, irritated by grains of sand, give birth to pearls. Brains, irritated by curiosity, give birth to ideas."

"Brainpower is the bridge to the future; it is what transports you from wishful thinking to willful doing."

"Unless you keep learning & growing, the status quo has no status."

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

EMPOWERING WOMAN GRASSROOTS LEADERS IN NORTHERN INDIA

My good buddy, Dilip Mukerjea, is seen here sharing his innovative empowerment strategies with woman grassroots leaders somewhere in the remote villages of Northern India.










Sunday, January 25, 2015

MANIFESTO FOR A LEARNING REVOLUTION TO ADDRESS ALL SECTORS OF SOCIETY




This is the front cover and brief table of contents of Dilip Mukerjea's latest masterpiece, which will be published shortly. 

It contains a slew of future-readiness and future-savviness imperatives and it's targeted at policy makers, administrators and educators.

 He may have written the book with India in mind, but all the ideas are applicable elsewhere.

Friday, January 23, 2015

CHANGE MANAGEMENT OR TEMPORARY INSANITY?


A QUICK LESSON ON MASTERING THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE: "Fewer" vs. "Less"



My good buddy, Dilip Mukerjea, an accomplished author, braindancing expert, and also English Language maestro, shares his expert thoughts:

"Gentlemen,

Referring to my point last evening about the distinction and the predominant INcorrect use of "less" in common parlance, please find my explanation of the point I was making:

Misuse of the terms fewer and less will set off alarms in the heads of many language enthusiasts.

According to usage rules, fewer is only to be used when discussing countable things, while less is used for singular mass nouns.

For example, you can have fewer ingredients, dollars, people, or puppies, but less salt, money, honesty, or love.

If you can count it, go for fewer. If you can’t, opt for less.

However, it’s not that simple.

Since the reign of Alfred the Great, a time when Old English was spoken, less has been used in the same way that fewer is currently used.

This long history of usage accounts for supermarkets posting the words “10 Items or Less” over the express lanes, when “10 Items or Fewer” is the grammatically correct option.

If we know the intended meaning of the supermarket signs, does using fewer or less really matter? 

To many who have internalised the fewer or less distinction, the answer is yes.

Using less where fewer is expected will sound jarring to their ears, so consider this as you count items or amounts in the future.

Pax Vobiscum!

:D:):p

Thursday, January 15, 2015

A NICE QUOTE FROM DILIP MUKERJEA

A nice quote from my good buddy Dilip Mukerjea, based in Mumbai, India:

"Humans often suffer from kainophobia, the fear of new things. 

Of course, this is a fear that most children do not experience. 
It is adults, be they policy makers, administrators, educators, who are beset by this fear.

They prefer to stay quivering in their cocoons, or should I say, fossilised in their mausoleums. 

We must move on from enclosing ourselves within bricks and mortar to liberating ourselves with brains and wits.

To this end, the time has come for humankind to become humane and kind. To ourselves, to our co-inhabitants of this planet. 

We have a primal need to address our spirituality. 

All of this comes from life, governed by the functions of the human brain... "

[Excerpted from his latest piece of writing, a 188-page 'MANIFESTO FOR A LEARNING REVOLUTION TO ADDRESS ALL SECTORS OF SOCIETY', targeted at policy makers, administrators and educators.]

Friday, October 31, 2014

A GREAT WAY TO INNOVATE

"A great way to innovate is to take an idea from another place and be the first to apply it in your field.

Take as an example the assembly line. 

Henry Ford (1863 – 1947) is often credited with the innovation of the assembly line in mass manufacturing and he was the first to use it in automobile manufacture.

Ford got the idea from an abattoir. He was impressed with the efficiency of the Swift slaughterhouse in Chicago where carcasses were butchered as they moved along a conveyor.

Ray Kroc (1902 – 1984) adopted the idea and applied it to the restaurant business when he ran the McDonald’s chain. 

He applied the assembly line principle to hamburger preparation and transformed productivity and speed of service in restaurants.

An Indian ophthalmologist, Dr. Govindappa Venkataswamy (1918 – 2006), admired the McDonald’s approach and decided to try a similar method for the low-cost treatment of cataracts in India.

He trained paramedics to do 70% of the work required in each surgery freeing up doctors to perform the more demanding tasks. He brought assembly line thinking to the process and reduced the cost of each cataract operation to around $10 (compared to say $1700 in the USA).

In a nut shell, an idea from a slaughterhouse transformed car assembly, fast food restaurants and eye surgery."

[Thanks to innovation strategist Paul Sloane, writing in www.innovationexcellence.com/blog/]




Monday, October 20, 2014

THE INNOVATION ENGINE, by Prof Tina Seelig


I like what I am reading:

“As a scientist, when I do an experiment that doesn't work as I expected, what do I call it? Data.

It’s not a failure.
In fact, some of the most interesting scientific research comes from experiments that have unexpected results.

The key is to look at the things that don’t come out as expected as data that provides interesting clues to what is really happening.

If you are afraid of failure, you won’t try anything new.”

~ Prof Tina Seelig of Stanford University, neuro-scientist and author of 'inGenius: A Crash Course in Creativity';

Here's a nice graphic rendition of the Escher-like creativity model, 'The Innovation Engine', conceived by Prof Tina Seeling by Dilip Mukerjea.